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About Texas Nurses Association
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Empowering Texas Nurses to advance the profession

The Texas Nurses Association (TNA) is a statewide membership-based professional association of licensed nurses. Founded in 1907, TNA is the oldest and largest nursing association in Texas.

Our members represent all segments of nursing practice — bedside to administration, consulting to advanced practice, and education to legislation — and all practice settings, including hospital, home and community health, public health, higher education, long-term care, school health and policy.

As diverse as they are, TNA members share a common purpose: Advancing excellence in nursing. It's a pursuit that requires commitment, involvement, and leadership. Fortunately, these are inherent traits of nurses.

What We Believe 

Mission: Empowering Texas Nurses to advance the profession

Vision: Nurses transforming health

Values: Respect Integrity Excellence Diversity Courage

What We Do

TNA is not a union. We are a voluntary organization that works with everyone to get good things accomplished for nurses and their patients.

Every member is encouraged to get involved. TNA is governed by a House of Delegates (HOD). The HOD meets annually and is made up of delegates representing TNA's districts.

  • The Policy ProcessPolicies adopted by the House of Delegates are overseen by TNA's elected Board of Directors and carried out by the more than 300 members who serve on TNA committees, task forces, or who represent TNA to other statewide professional organizations.
  • The Board of Directors also appoints applicants to the Policy Council and committees. Including the expert advisors, over 600 nurses contribute to legislative policy development. 
  • The TNA membership also elects a delegation to represent it at the American Nurses Association's (ANA) Membership Assembly.

History

In 1907, a group of 19 Texas nurses met in Fort Worth to create The Graduate Nurses’ Association of the State of Texas to establish an organization for seeking state regulation of the practice and education of nursing.

The newly formed organization started by proposing a bill to the Texas Legislature for creating a state registration for nurses, which passed in 1909 — before women could even vote. This bill created the Board of Nurse Examiners for the State of Texas, and was, in essence, the first nursing practice act.   

In 1913, TGNA successfully raised standards for nursing schools, including an eight-hour day for students, three-year courses in all schools of nursing, raised entrance requirements, uniform curriculum, and better preparation for teaching and supervision.

By 1964, the Graduate Nurses’ Association was renamed the Texas Nurses Association. A few years later, TNA helped create a true Nursing Practice Act. In the years that follow, TNA successfully lobbied to add a definition of nursing practice, whistle-blower protection, peer review and more to the NPA.

In the past ten years, TNA has continued its legislative work and successfully took action to have Texas join the Mutual Recognition Interstate Compact, to pass the Nursing Shortage Reduction Act, to require hospitals to have written staffing plans and to implement the Safe Patient Handling law (the first of its kind in the nation).

Read about the first 100 years of TNA

Read about the history of the Nursing Practice Act

Read about TNA's history of legislative involvement

Partnerships

TNA is involved in a number of community initiatives and alliances, including: 

 

Texas Nurses Association

Texas Affiliate of ANA | 4807 Spicewood Springs Rd., Bldg 3, Austin TX

800.862.2022 | 512.452.0645 | tna@texasnurses.org